Eurypterids.net
EURYPTERIDS:  MUSEUM DISPLAYS 1
Samuel J. Ciurca, Jr., Rochester, New York
DENVER MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, DENVER, COLORADO
AT LEFT: Photograph taken by Barbara Bridson of a display of eurypterids she saw when visiting the museum in October, 2002.
INTERPRETATION:  The label accom- panying the exhibit is not particularly informative, and certainly not designed for adult visitors, so the following is my inter- pretation.  The slab at left is Phelps Waterlime, a finely-crystalline dolostone member of the Fiddlers Green Fm. found in the hills north of Illion, New York. The slab contains molted specimens of the eurypterid, Eurypterus remipes, that were most likely washed into a hypersaline environment during a storm event, and covered by saline dolomitic muds.  The 'animals' are part of a windrow, a linear accumulation of animal debris produced during such storm events. The windrow is oriented from the upper right to the lower left. Such windrows are charac- teristic of all of the eurypterid deposits of the Late Silurian of New York State and adjacent Ontario, Canada.  Salt hopper structures are often associated and are the principle upon which environmental interpretation is based. Similar alligned arthropods can be observed. on beaches today, eg. at Cape Cod, where crab shells accumulate in windrows along the shoreline. Molts of the horseshoe crab are collected together on the shores of Long Island.
BUFFALO MUSEUM OF SCIENCE
BUFFALO, NEW YORK
On November 21, 2004, I visited the Buffalo Museum to see the recently reconstructed eurypterid exhibit. I was impressed and photographed some of what I saw. See the photos below.          MORE PHOTOS
The Buffalo Museum has one of the finest collections of eurypterids in North America. It emphasizes the fauna of the Williamsville Waterlime of the Buffalo area, so lacks a wide range of eurypterid material from other parts of the world. Nevertheless, the specimens are of the highest quality and many of the rarer forms are represented in the collection. Most of the mater- ial comes from quarries at Buffalo and nearby areas, e.g. Williamsville,  that ex- isted in the late 1800s and the turn of the century.
MUSEUM DISPLAYS 2
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